Saturday, 2 May 2015

The Independent Magazine - Displaced young adults are living in a graveyard in Liberia's capital Monrovia

"Anyone would guess it was a prison. Its four-metre-high walls are topped with coiled barbed wire and punctuated with watchtowers. Its tall metal gates are locked. Yet a glimpse through one door, left slightly ajar, reveals its inmates died years ago. The site in Monrovia, Liberia's capital, is an abandoned cemetery where no one has been buried for decades. The walls aren't there to confine the dead, but to keep out the living – people whom Liberian society has forgotten who inhabit its crumbling tombs.

"There was a body there, but I took it out and threw it away," says Junior Toe. A veteran tomb dweller, as those occupying the cemetery are known, he has lost count of his years living among the dead. Standing on the worn edge of an open tomb, he peers into his second-hand bedroom. The empty space, about two-metres deep, is finished with stained green tiles crossed by vines. "When you look for a tomb, the body can't be too fresh," he advises. "It has to be really dead, then you can clear it away into a bag..."

Read the full article on Independent.co.uk.



I made two trips to Liberia to gather material for this exclusive story, which has never been reported before in the UK.

It was only possible with the help of charity Street Child which is supporting the young people living in the cemetery.

The pictures were taken by award-winning freelance photographer Hannah Maule-Ffinch.

Thursday, 2 April 2015

Devex - DfID to increase trade role in future - Greening


“The U.K. Department for International Development could play an increasing role in trade in the future, according U.K. Secretary of State for International Development Justine Greening.

Speaking exclusively to Devex in London after delivering her final speech before the U.K. general elections on May 7, Greening said the department was progressively looking to enhance economies in developing countries…”


Read the full article at Devex.com

Wednesday, 1 April 2015

Young people's role in international development

In spring 2015 I wrote a series of articles focused on how young people play a role in international development for Devex.com. Here is a selection from the #YouthWill campaign:

Three key ingredients for building a peaceful generation


Millions of young people affected by conflict around the world are trying to make their voices heard. Whether they do so peacefully depends on their inclusion in communities’ social and political development… Read more

What young people need to lead

U.K. Young Ambassador to the Commonwealth Leon Ward, 23, dedicates his time to activities many adults might find surprising. In addition to a full-time job, he delivers young U.K. citizens’ views to heads of state of the 53 Commonwealth countries. He is a trustee of global development charity Plan International, and also supports a national charity campaigning on young people’s sexual health… Read more

In Libya, a young woman helms crusade for a gender-balanced future – interview with Alaa Murabit

International observers have widely credited young people for their role in the Arab Spring. For one young woman in Libya, the 2011 revolution sparked hope women’s rights would change in her country… Read more

What young people want from development implementers

“I’ve been doing my work for six years now but I’ve never been approached by an agency looking at development.” Read more

Three ways to support youth as agents of change

Among the many development programs and projects featuring elements directed toward young people, how many support youth-led activities?.. Read more

4 ways #globaldev implementers can engage youth in civic activity

How can development professionals working with young people make sure that young people’s voices are heard in their communities, particularly in poor or violent societies?.. Read more


Young people lead the fight for peaceful elections in Nigeria

With about 63 percent of Nigeria’s 177 million inhabitants aged under 24, it will be the young people who hold the decisive vote when the country goes to the polls March 28 to choose the nation’s next president… Read more